Quantum Communication

Quantum communication moves into the unknown

By David Deutsch and Artur Ekert

Information is physical and any processing of information is always performed by physical means - an innocent-sounding statement, but its consequences are anything but trivial, In the last few years there has been an explosion of theoretical and experimental innovations which, their discoverers claim, are creating a fundamental new discipline: a distinctively quantum theory of information.

Difficulty: 
General
Abstract: 
A short introduction to quantum information, including "teleportation". By David Deutsch and Artur Ekert.

General NanoComputing

Towards Quantum Information Technology

Prepared for the PdJ Production & ARTE by Simon Benjamin and Artur Ekert.

Shrinking Computer

Difficulty: 
General
Abstract: 
A brief overview of the evolution of computing toward the "nanometre" scale where quantum mechanics may be exploited. By Simon Benjamin and Artur Ekert.

Physicists Triumph at Guess My Number

Physicists Triumph at Guess My Number

Andrew M. Steane and Wim van Dam


This article appeared in Physics Today, February 2000, pages 35-39.

Quantum entanglement looks like telepathy when three physicists get together on a game show.

"Let's meet tonight's lucky contestants, ladies and gentlemen, all ready to play Guess my number, for the grand prize of ONE MILLION DOLLARS!"

The suave host turns to the group of three eager-looking people, and addresses the young woman first:

Difficulty: 
Undergraduate Level
Abstract: 
A popular article about the reduction of communication complexity with the nonlocal correlations of quantum mechanics. By Andrew Steane and Wim van Dam.

Quantum Entanglement

Quantum Entanglement

by Leah Henderson and Vlatko Vedral

In the day-to-day world that is well described by classical physics, we often observe correlations. Imagine you are observing a bank robbery. The bank robber is pointing a gun at the terrified teller. By looking at the teller you can tell whether the gun has gone off or not. If the teller is alive and unharmed, you can be sure the gun has not fired. If the teller is lying dead of a gun-shot wound on the floor, you know that the gun has fired.

Difficulty: 
General
Abstract: 
An introduction to the phenomenon of quantum entanglement, which quantum computers would exploit to achieve their superiority over ordinary 'classical' computers. By Leah Henderson and Vlatko Vedral

Cryptography and Relativity

Difficulty: 
General
Abstract: 
Cryptography can help with problems of trust. Instead of trusting other people involved, you need only check that the code does what it's supposed to do, and this can (sometimes) be proved.

Quantum Algorithms

Difficulty: 
General

What are Quantum Computers?

Difficulty: 
General
Abstract: 
What is a Quantum Computer? How powerful is it? Can we build one?

Quantum Cryptography

What is Quantum Cryptography?

by Artur Ekert

What is Wrong with Classical Cryptography?

Difficulty: 
General
Abstract: 
An introduction to the exploitation of quantum mechanics for perfectly secure communication. By Artur Ekert.

Lectures on Quantum Computation

Difficulty: 
Undergraduate Level
Abstract: 
Lectures on Quantum Computation, Les Houches summer school 1999, by Artur Ekert, Patrick Hayden and Hitoshi Inamori (lecture notes, Postscript file)
Syndicate content